How to Change Mindsets

How do you Change Mindsets?

Can it even be done? Some would argue that at some point, no. At HeartBridge Learning Lab we say yes! But doing so requires focus, determination and a process.  A process proven to change mindsets.  And just where do you prove such a process? In a laboratory of course, in our case HeartBridge Learning Lab.

Step 1. Learn to hear your fixed mindset “voice”

fixed mindset voice
You have to recognize your “fixed ” mindset voice

As you approach a challenge, that voice might say to you “Are you sure you can do it? Maybe you don’t have the talent.” “What if you fail—you’ll be a failure” “People will laugh at you for thinking you had talent.” “If you don’t try, you can protect yourself and keep your dignity.”

As you hit a setback, the voice might say, “This would have been a snap if you really had talent.” “You see, I told you it was a risk. Now you’ve gone and shown the world how limited you are.” “ It’s not too late to back out, make excuses, and try to regain your dignity.”

As you face criticism, you might hear yourself say, “It’s not my fault. It was something or someone else’s fault.” You might feel yourself getting angry at the person who is giving you feedback. “Who do they think they are? I’ll put them in their place.” The other person might be giving you specific, constructive feedback, but you might be hearing them say “I’m really disappointed in you. I thought you were capable but now I see you’re not.”

How to change a mindset

Step 2. Recognize that you have a choice

How you interpret challenges, setbacks, and criticism is your choice. You can interpret them in a fixed mindset as signs that your fixed talents or abilities are lacking. Or you can interpret them in a growth mindset as signs that you need to ramp up your strategies and effort, stretch yourself, and expand your abilities. It’s up to you.

So as you face challenges, setbacks, and criticism, listen to the fixed mindset voice and…

Step 3. Talk back to it with a growth mindset voice

As you approach a challenge:

Fixed vs Growth Mindsets
Address the Fixed mindsets you recognize

THE FIXED-MINDSET says “Are you sure you can do it? Maybe you don’t have the talent.”

THE GROWTH-MINDSET answers, “I’m not sure I can do it now, but I think I can learn to with time and effort.”

FIXED MINDSET: “What if you fail—you’ll be a failure”

GROWTH MINDSET: “Most successful people had failures along the way.”

FIXED MINDSET: “If you don’t try, you can protect yourself and keep your dignity.”

GROWTH MINDSET: “If I don’t try, I automatically fail. Where’s the dignity in that?”

As you hit a setback:

FIXED MINDSET: “This would have been a snap if you really had talent.”

GROWTH MINDSET: “That is so wrong. Basketball wasn’t easy for Michael Jordan and science wasn’t easy for Thomas Edison. They had a passion and put in tons of effort.

As you face criticism:

FIXED MINDSET: “It’s not my fault. It was something or someone else’s fault.”

GROWTH MINDSET: “If I don’t take responsibility, I can’t fix it. Let me listen—however painful it is– and learn whatever I can.”

Then…

Step 4. Take the growth mindset action

Over time, which voice you heed becomes pretty much your choice. Whether you

  • take on the challenge wholeheartedly,
  • learn from your setbacks and try again
  • hear the criticism and act on it is now in your hands.

Practice hearing both voices, and practice acting on the growth mindset. See how you can make it work for you. It can truly change mindsets.

The HeartBridge Learning System

HeartBridge Learning System

HeartBridge Learning System

We believe

Students in the United States are facing daunting challenges like never before.  The pace of change is unprecedented, so much so that the rate of technological and cognitive expansion is unfathomable. The liberated sharing of knowledge worldwide is changing politics, social orders, education processes, business practices, and commercial endeavors at speeds never thought possible even in the last ten years. We have moved from learning in a one-room schoolhouse, where the teacher was the conduit of knowledge for multi-age apparatuses, having to impart thousands of pages of information to children in the short amount of time that they had with them, to presently learning from a handheld device that can give us instant information that used to take months, if not years, of research. What was once noteworthy and difficult to measure has developed into what is vastly insignificant and easy to measure.

And yet, with all of our advances, we have forgotten that learning is not only about the factual and the empirical. A man can learn all there is to know about physics, but be completely ignorant of morality and social responsibility. We have shifted our learning focus to what can be easily driven by data instead of what builds character and strength in our students.  21st Century readiness depends as much on how we learn as what we learn.

Educators and policy drivers in the United States are obsessed with our academic standing in the world, when no research suggests a that a country’s success is dependent on one country’s students knowing more than another country’s. Yes, the foundations of academic content should not only be taught but mastered, but non-cognitive skills should be given equal weight in order for our students to succeed in this new and ever-evolving environment.

The HeartBridge Learning System Explained!